PDN Photo of the Day

Camera-less Images Made with Wind, Sand and Sea

Meghann Riepenhoff’s recent work is rooted in her fascination with humans’ relationships to the landscape, time, and impermanence. Entitled “Littoral Drift,” a geologic term describing the action of waves transporting sand and gravel, the series consists of camera-less cyanotypes. The work is made in collaboration with aquatic and terrestrial elements —waves, surface water, wind, and sediment— that leave physical inscriptions through direct contact with photographic materials. Photochemically, the pieces are never entirely processed; they will continue to subtly change in response to the environments they encounter over time.

Images from “Littoral Drift,” as well as work from some of Riepenhoff’s other camera-less series, will be on view at Jackson Fine Art in September in an exhibition titled Imprint.

Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Riepenhoff returned to the American South to make “Littoral Drift” in the landscapes she knew growing up. “The dynamic prints serve as a kind of analogy, visualizing the way the landscape imprints on those who encounter it, and the ways it manifests impermanence over time,” writes the gallery in the press release. Georgia Red Clay stains prints made at the Chattahoochee River or in North Georgia Lakes; rain drops from summer storms mark prints from Hilton Head Island’s shoreline. These places have shaped Riepenhoff’s experience, and in turn, have shaped the works in Imprint.

Riepenhoff is based in Bainbridge Island, Washington, and San Francisco, California. She received a BFA in Photography from the University of Georgia, Athens, and an MFA from San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA, where she is a part of the visiting faculty. Her photography has been exhibited internationally and nationally at major museums, and she is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards.

Imprint
By Meghann Riepenhoff
Jackson Fine Art
Atlanta, Georgia
September 28-December 22, 2018

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