PDN Photo of the Day

Manchuria Crossroads (10 Photos)

Manchuria Crossroads (10 Photos)

 

All Photos unless otherwise noted © Q Sakamaki/Redux

Q Sakamaki photographed throughout China’s Northeast which was once called Manchuria. The region was a crossroads, transformed by history through migration, resource exploitation, occupation and war. And now the area is facing new upheaval due to globalization and China’s rapid economic growth, creating a gap between the rich and poor, as well as contributing to a rise in unemployment.

Above: An unemployed man at a memorial park of Tiexi District in Shen Yang in China’s North East that used to have many of the government owned iron factories and houses for workers. Many of the factories were closed, creating high unemployment. Now the area has been turning into high rise residential buildings with often unfair land grabs.

- courtesy of Redux

Men build the frames of a site for the Winter Festival in Harbin in China’s frigid, remote North East.

People enjoy themselves on the frozen Songhua river in Harbin in China’s frigid, remote North East.

 

A view of industrial coal town of Jixi in China’s North East. Coal is still a primary source for power, heating and cooking fuel in China, despite the environmental health hazards.

 

 

 

In the frigid, remote town of Jixi in China’s North East, in temperatures of minus 20 C or minus 4 F, a woman slipped, hurting herself on the frozen street.

 

 

 

A woman is seen through a frozen bus window in the frigid remote town of Jidong in China’s North East, in temperatures below minus 20 C or minus 4 F.
A volunteer Chinese guide points out a photograph, showing a Japanese soldier executing an innocent farmer during the Japanese occupation of Manchuria. It hangs at a wall of the rebuilt Shuishiying where Japan and Russia signed a ceasefire agreement.

 

 

A photograph of Lady Gobulo (Empress Xiaokemin) at the former Imperial Palace of Manchukuo, or the Manchu State, where China’s last Qing, and then Manchukuo, emperor Puyi stayed as Japanese puppet from 1932 to 1945. After the fall of Manchukuo, the palace was damaged when Soviet troops looted the city of Changchun. Afterwards, the structures were preserved and opened as the Museum of Imperial Palace of Illegitimate “Manchu State” . Changchun, Jilin province, China’s North East.

 

Russian style architecture is reflected in the glass of a western styled show-window in the main street of Harbin, as the city was once occupied by Russia and then by Japan when the region was called Manchuria.

High-rise luxury residential buildings are seen over coal slag piles at Harbin in China’s North East. Coal is still a primary source for power, heating and cooking fuel in China, despite the environmental health hazards.

 

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